Garden Views

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As this week's Tuesday View comes along, I decided to share views from around the garden.

 

First, the usual view down the South Border.  Looking a little lean now as the early and mid-spring flowers are gone, it is transitioning toward summer with miniature roses coming into bloom while Catharanthus roseus, the mainstay of flower color during summer, is growing out but not yet blooming.  What I have not shown is the first few flowers from sweet peas, tucked into the back of the border.  I'm not sure how much of a showing I will get from them before the heat takes them out, but at least I have a few blooms!

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The lavender mini rose is a very profuse bloomer once it gets going!

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Moving on from the South Border, here is the Central Bed, looking up toward the patio (see also the picture at top of this post).  Here I have tried for a distinctly cottage garden effect.  The bright orange of Hippeastrum "Naranja" competes for notice with a towering spire of hollyhock, not yet in bloom.  The deep pink hues belong to Penstemon pseudospectabilis "Coconino County" and rose "William Shakespeare 2000". 

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"Naranja" is tucked behind Lavandula x "Goodwin's Creek Gray".

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"William Shakespeare 2000" really is more crimson than shown in these photos, a good color to accent the lower corner of the bed.

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The other corner is occupied by "The Alnwick Rose", all a-tumble with flowers now.  Rose "Sterling Silver" can be seen behind it.

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One cluster is tumbling into iris leaves...

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At the top of the bed is rose "Wollerton Old Hall", the queen of the garden.

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I thought it was also time to show some pictures from the North Border as well, since despite its very unfinished state, it is beginning to fill in a little.  Here we have, clockwise from upper left, Salvia farinacea in front of tropical shrub Hamelia patens, two blooms from rose "Mister Lincoln", dwarf Callistemon citrinus "Little John" with a cane of "Mister Lincoln" lolling behind, and a noID miniature rose in front of an equally noID lavender, presumably some variety of L. stoechas.

And finally, over to the Rose Border, which runs along behind the patio.  The big shrub roses are just in their first flush of bloom, some sadly marred by thrips this year.  All that winter rain does have its disadvantages.  But it's lovely to have the roses coming in.  Oddly enough, "Graham Thomas" seems less affected than some of the others.

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roses "James Galway" and "Graham Thomas"
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rose "Graham Thomas"
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rose "St. Swithun"

I certainly have taken liberties with the theme, but I did want to share a few extra angles on the garden today.  Many thanks to Cathy for hosting the Tuesday View at Words and Herbs!

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Weather Diary: Fair; High: 92 F (33 C)/Low: 60 F (16 C); Humidity: 12%-44%

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Comments: 7
  • #1

    Cathy (Wednesday, 19 April 2017 04:20)

    With all those roses your garden is looking fabulous Amy! I find it hard to believe how you can grow so much in the desert, even Hollyhocks! The Hippeastrum is a lovely colour. I tried growing some Catharanthus from seed, but nothing germinated. :(
    Thanks for joining me. Have a lovely week!

  • #2

    Kris P (Wednesday, 19 April 2017 14:37)

    Your garden really is filling out and gaining the cottage-y vibe you sought, Amy! I'm envious of the hollyhock - I tried planting a supposedly tough variety in my cutting garden but, even careful as I was about protecting the leaves from water splashes, it still ended up with rust and I finally gave up, pulling it out. My Catharanthus experiment also seems a failure, although I've left most of those plants in place, hoping that warmer weather will miraculously transform them. Nonetheless, I remain tempted to dry some of the miniature roses you've had such success with.

  • #3

    Amy@smallsunnygarden (Thursday, 20 April 2017 01:34)

    Thank you so much, Cathy :) The Hollyhocks are a surprise, but I've been told they are good for growing here so thought I should give them a try. I've never tried Catharanthus from seed; I keep thinking they would be good for starting from cuttings, but my first attempt has just failed... They are such vigorous plants that there should be some good way to propagate!
    Hope you have a great week too!

  • #4

    Amy@smallsunnygarden (Thursday, 20 April 2017 01:47)

    Kris - I'm afraid the styles in my garden are a bit mix and match ;-) As for the hollyhock, after my sister grew them in Kansas City I nearly swore I never, never would try them. But I'm told the dry air keeps the foliage healthy here. Which just goes to show that single digit humidity is good for some things... I would definitely hope the Catharanthus would pick up as the heat rises; its tastes in temperatures seem to be distinctly tropical! Mine are still sulking a bit too.

  • #5

    David C. (Saturday, 22 April 2017 16:50)

    A new desert garden blog...glad I found your's. That "Graham Thomas" rose is impressive; I'm amazed how well roses do in the southwest, at least in an oasis with some extra water.

    Time to read your past posts...

  • #6

    Amy@smallsunnygarden (Sunday, 23 April 2017 23:22)

    David - Thanks so much for dropping by! "Graham Thomas" got off to a very slow start but is filling out fairly well now. It's so nice not to worry about black spot all summer long, though water is certainly a limiting factor.

  • #7

    Annette (Friday, 21 July 2017 03:57)

    Hi Amy, thanks for sharing the link with me. Pleasure to walk around your garden, it looks great, not what you'd expect from a desert location. I've to abandon the dreams of sweet peas as they don't like the heat. Penstemon do very well though and yours is pretty too. Just taken some cuttings of my plum coloured one. Love Wollerton Old Hall, it looks divine and considering how well it does for you it might be a good choice for our garden...if only there was more room ;) Best wishes