Sadly

Yesterday we said good-bye to my beautiful little garden helper.  Bella was an incredibly special part of my life for almost fifteen years.  Her gentle heart helped me through some very dark times, and will always be a source of wonder and gratitude to me.  Farewell, Bella.

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Wildflowers for Wednesday: Prosopis velutina

In the back yard there is a young Mesquite tree (Prosopis velutina).  It sprouted as a volunteer a couple of years ago.  It is in a very good spot for a tree; and though I water it reprehensibly seldom, it has grown tall enough to be just visible from the house.

 

This year is the first time I have seen it bloom.  Of course, one has to walk right up to it to see the flowers.  The inflorescences are large, but their soft yellow-green colors keep them hidden among the leaves.

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Garden Bloom in April

rose St. Swithun
rose St. Swithun

April is a rich month in the garden.

 

I don't have the time or space to share everything that is in bloom; this post will be photo-heavy as it is!  But here are some highlights, in no particular order.

 

Well, some order.  Because we must begin with the roses, no?

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A Favorite Combination

rose William Shakespeare 2000 with Penstemon pseudospectabilis Coconino County

This post is mostly pictures.  A rose (William Shakespeare 2000)...

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Charming in Pink

narcissus Pink Charm

Narcissus 'Pink Charm' was recommended to me last year by a friend in Houston, TX, as a good daffodil for growing in a mild-winter climate.  I ordered some bulbs last autumn and planted them to fill in the gap that would be left when rose 'Angel Face' and the Catharanthus roseus got their winter pruning.

 

It's been a good season overall for narcissus.  Over winter, I actually despaired of seeing these come up and flower.  I had somehow forgotten that large-cupped and trumpet daffodils don't usually stick their noses up through winter weather, unlike their small, bold  cousins, the jonquillas, tazettas, and such.

 

When the leaves did appear, they took me by surprise, but what a nice surprise!  The flowers, too, are lovely, with a lightly lacy frill to the trumpets.  And those are as colorfast as need be, especially considering the amount of bright sunlight they receive.

 

I grew the occasional pink-cupped daffodil in my first garden.  'Romance' was the one I liked best there.  But I never became enamored of them, frankly preferring the cheerful yellows, whites, and oranges that shriek 'Daffodil!'  But I think I am quietly falling in love with the soft apricot-pink of this charmer.

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